Conversation with Jerry Rubin

Dublin Core

Title

Conversation with Jerry Rubin

Subject

Speech

Description

Jerry Rubin became a journalist during his student years then became a full-time agitator in response to the Vietnam War. He was an organizer of Berkeley's Vietnam Day Committee (VDC) in 1965 which held the world's largest teach-in against the war.
In 1968 Rubin and Hoffman, in connection with various peace groups, led what proved to be a far more violent anti-war protest. They planned to hold a “Festival of Life" in Chicago during the Democratic National Convention. While carrying out other acts of vandalism, the police to beat and arrest them. It was a source of particular satisfaction to Rubin that bystanders and members of the press also fell victim to police enthusiasm. Rubin, Hoffman, and others came to be called the "Chicago Seven," The trial was scandalous in the extreme and ultimately all eight—plus their lawyers—were found to be in contempt of court. Though convicted on lesser counts by a jury, none of the defendants went to jail as the trial had been a farce and the verdicts did not stand up on appeal.
This is a speech he did at Purdue Northwest in 1980 hosted by the student government.

Creator

Purdue University Northwest

Date

1980-02-07

Rights

Purdue University Northwest

Language

English

Collection

Citation

Purdue University Northwest, “Conversation with Jerry Rubin ,” PNW Digital, accessed October 17, 2019, http://pnwdigital.libraryhost.com/items/show/102.